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Woodland Tee

by Rebecca Newman

Photo
» photos: Rebecca Newman
Easy

I was inspired by the tall trees of Eastwoodhill Arboretum, New Zealand, to design a practical textured tee and wee owl for endless entertainment hidden in the front pocket. Perfect for distracting your wee one while you lounge around in the shade of a dappled tree on long summer days.


 


Sizes

Newborn [3 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months, 18 months, 2T]
Owl softie 2½ x 3 inches
Shown in size 6 months

Finished Measurements

Chest: 17 [18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23] inches
Length: 8 [9½, 10½, 11, 12¼, 12¾, 13¼] inches

Materials

Blue Sky Alpacas, Skinny Cotton [100% Organic cotton; 150yards / 137 meters per 2.25 ounce / 65 gram hank];

#313 Basil; 1[2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3] hanks

Recommended needle sizes

US #5 (3.75 mm) 12 inch and 16 inch circular needles

Notions

Woodland Tee
Four stitch markers, one different for the start of round marker
Tapestry needle
Scissors

Owl Pocket Friend
Wool felt scraps of various colors
Tapestry floss in coordinating colors
Tapestry needle
Scissors

Gauge

21 sts and 44 rnds = 4 inches in Seed st
Gauge is critical for this design.

Pattern Notes

Woodland tee is a raglan worked from the top down in the round with seed stitch and waffle stitch details. The pattern also includes a waffle stitch pocket sewn on with whipstitch or preferred method, and contains a hand sewn owl softie made from wool felt scraps.

Seed St: On first row, (k1, p1) around; on second row, (p1, k1) around. Repeat these 2 rows for pattern. After the first rnd, always knit the purl sts and purl the knit sts.
M1: Lift bar from row below with left needle from the front and place on left needle, knit into the back of the stitch with right needle
Sm: Slip marker
K2tog: Knit two stitch together, decreasing by one stitch

Skills Required

Seed Stitch, Waffle stitch and whipstitch

Instructions

* Cast on 13[14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19] sts, pm, cast on 19[20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25] sts, pm: repeat from * once more, making sure last marker placed is unique to mark end of rnd. Join to work in rnds, being careful not to twist sts: 64[68, 72, 76, 80, 84, 88] sts.
Rnd 1: * (K1,p1) to marker, sm; repeat from *around.
Rnd 2: * K1, m1, work in Seed st to marker, m1, sm; repeat from * around: 72[76, 80, 84, 88, 92, 96] sts.
Rnd 3: * K1, work in Seed st to marker, sm; repeat from * around.
Rnds 4-11: Repeat Rnds 2 and 3, 4 times: 104[108, 112, 116, 120, 124, 128] sts.
Rnd 12: * K1, m1, work in Seed st to next marker, m1, sm, k1, m1, knit to next marker, m1, sm; repeat from * once more: 112[116, 120, 124, 128, 132, 136] sts.
Rnd 13: * K1, work in Seed st to next marker, sm, knit to next marker, sm; repeat from * once more.
Repeat Rnds 12 and 13, 7[8, 9, 9, 11, 11, 12] times more: 168[180, 192, 196, 216, 220, 232] sts.

You should have 39[42, 45, 46, 51, 52, 55] sts for each sleeve (first and third sections) and 45[48, 51, 52, 57, 58, 61] sts for back and front (second and fourth sections)
Sleeve Separation Rnd: Bind off first 39[42, 45, 46, 51, 52, 55] sts loosely, removing marker when binding off the last st, knit to next marker, m1, remove marker, bind off next 39[42, 45, 46, 51, 52, 55] sts loosely, knit to next marker, remove stitch marker 90[96, 102, 104, 114, 116, 122] sts

Detail

Body

For sizes 3 months, 9 months and 18 months Only – Next Rnd: M1, knit to last st of front, m1, k2tog, joining front and back sections, m1, knit to last st of back, m1, k2tog, joining back and front sections, place start of round marker.

For All Other Sizes – Next Rnd: Knit to last st of front, m1, k2tog, joining front and back sections, knit to last st of back, m1, k2tog, joining back and front sections, place start of round marker.

Your stitch count will be 90[98, 102, 106, 114, 118, 122] sts.

Knit around until piece measures 6½[7, 8, 8½, 9, 9½, 10] inches from the top of the shoulder.

Knit one rnd decreasing 2 sts for all size as follows: k2tog at the start of the rnd, then knit 43[47, 49, 51, 55, 57, 59] sts, k2tog, and knit to the end of the rnd: 88[96, 100, 104, 112, 116, 120] sts.

Detail

Lower Band
Work in Waffle stitch for approx.
Rnd 1: Purl around.
Rnd 2: Knit around.
Rnds 3 and 4: (K2, p2) around.
Repeat Rnds 1-4 for 2½[2½, 2½, 2½, 3¼, 3¼, 3¼] inches, ending with Rnd 3.
Bind off all sts loosely. Weave in ends.

Pocket
Cast on 20 sts.
Row 1: Knit across.
Rows 2 and 3: (K2, p2) across
Rows 4 and 5: Knit across.
Repeat Rows 2-5, 5 times.
Bind off all sts loosely. Cut yarn leaving long end for sewing.

Finishing

Pin pocket to center of Tee or preferred placement and, using long end, whipstitch or duplicate stitch to attach to Tee.

Owl Pocket Friend

Detail

Cut out pattern pieces from template provided in desired bright colors of felt.

Detail

Place the eye pieces on the front body piece and put the beak between and underneath the eye pieces.

Detail

Using an 8 inch length of embroidery floss, sew the eye to body using blanket stitch catching the beak at the same time.  Blanket stitch all the way around the eye and knot at the back. Repeat for the second eye.

Detail

Using black floss. work a cross stitch pupil in each eye.

Detail

Take the back body section and position the wing pieces, then place the feet piece on top. Lay the assembled front piece over back piece with WS together. Starting at the top left corner and using floss, join together using blanket stitch. 

Detail

Attach each wing and the feet piece as they are reached. When the top right corner is reached, stuff owl with scrap wool roving till quite full, then continuing the blanket stitch around. Knot firmly and thread end through the middle and trim thread.

Detail

Check that there are no loose threads on the Owl Softie and pop in the pocket of the Woodland Tee or give to the wee person wearing the Woodland Tee.

 

Detail

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Designer Photo

Rebecca’s first foray into knitting was at the age of nine, creating an awful apricot and
pink striped vest. But like many other knitters, she was lured back to the craft with
great enthusiasm when she was expecting her first child. She lives in New Zealand on a
sheep and cattle farm with her wonderful husband and two gorgeous children. Prior to
becoming a stay at home mother, Rebecca was a landscape designer and has never looked back.

Pattern © 2012 Rebecca. Contact 

© Copyright Petite Purls 2012